Gasoline versus Water

There is a lot of thermochemical energy in gasoline, but there is even more energy in water. The DOE (Department of Energy) has quoted about 40%, so it is probably much more than that.
There is a lot of thermochemical energy in gasoline, but there is even more energy in
water. The DOE (Department of Energy) has quoted about 40%, so it is probably much
more than that.
Most people are unaware that “internal combustion” is defined as “a thermo-vapor
process” – as in “no liquid in the reaction.” Most of the gasoline in a standard internal combustion engine is actually consumed, (cooked, and finally, broken down) in the catalytic
converter after the fuel has been not-so-burnt in the engine. Sadly, this means that most
of the fuel we use in this way is used only to cool down the combustion process, a pollution-
ridden and inefficient means of doing that.
How It Works
Exceedingly simple. Water is pumped as needed to replenish and maintain the liquid level in
the chamber. The electrodes are vibrated with a 0.5-5A electrical pulse which breaks
2(H2O) => 2H2 + O2. When the pressure reaches say 30-60 psi, you turn the key and go.
You step on the pedal, you send more energy to the electrodes, and thus more vapor to the
cylinders; i.e. fuel vapor on demand.
You set the idle max-flow rate to get the most efficient use of power, and you’re off to
the races.
In the big picture, your free energy is coming from the tap water in an open system, as
the latent energy in the water is enough to power the engine and hence drive the
alternator and whatever belt-driven accessories. And the alternator is efficient enough to
run the various electrical loads (10 – 20 amps), including the additional low current to run
this vapor reaction. No extra batteries are required.
STEP BY STEP CONSTRUCTION (Please refer to diagrams at the end of this document)
OVERVIEW – Here is the suggested sequence of steps:
1. Install the CHT (or EGT) gauge and measure your current operating temp range
(gasoline), for comparison.
2. Build and test the controller to verify the correct pulse output.
3. Build the reaction chamber and test it with the controller (i.e pressure out).
4. Install the tank, controller, chamber, and pressure fittings.
5. Run engine and adjust the control circuit as necessary for best performance.
6. Install the stainless steel valves and get the pistons/cylinders coated with ceramic.
7. Coat the exhaust system with ceramic without the catalytic converter (or let it rust out
and then replace the whole dang thang with stainless steel pipe sections).